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Constantin Brancusi Sculpture- The Museum of Modern Art( MoMA) - Through February 18, 2019 -

Looking back at the first showing of Constantin Brancusi's work (1876–1957) in the United States, in the 1913 Armory Show, one writer reflected that sculptures on view were “disturbing, so disturbing indeed that they completely altered the attitude of a great many New Yorkers towards a whole branch of art.” Indeed, Brancusi’s beguilingly simple forms looked like nothing else, then or since.

Rather than modeling clay like his peers, Brancusi carved his work directly from wood or stone, or cast it in bronze. Simultaneously, he rejected realism, preferring that his sculptures evoke rather than resemble the subjects named in their titles. Brancusi made bases for many of his sculptures, themselves complex constructions that became part of the work. He often moved works from base to base, or placed them directly on the floor of his studio, so that they lived in the world alongside ordinary objects, and among people.

Born in rural Romania, Brancusi moved to Paris in 1904, where he established his studio and quickly immersed himself in avant-garde art circles.
In his adopted city, he embraced an experimental modern spirit, including an interest in modern machines and popular culture. With his friend Man Ray, he made films that captured his life in the studio—working with his materials and muses, activating his artworks through movement and recombination, and revealing his sources of inspiration such as animals at play, light in nature, and dance. Yet until his death he proudly presented himself as an outsider—cultivating his image as a peasant, with a long beard, work shirt, and sandals.
The contradiction also informs his art making, which was dependent on ancient techniques as much as contemporary technologies.

This exhibition celebrates MoMA’s extraordinary holdings—11 sculptures by Brancusi will be shown together for the first time, alongside drawings, photographs, and films.
A selection of never-before-seen archival materials shed light on his relationships with friends, sitters, and patrons, including this Museum. What emerges is a rich portrait of an artist whose risk-taking and inventive approach to form changed the course of the art that followed.

Brancusi collected records with music of many kinds. The playlist below, created by curators Paulina Pobocha and Mia Matthias, features selections from his extensive collection.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture.


The exhibition is made possible by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Major support is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by Jack Shear with The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.



The Museum of Modern Art, Floor 2

Buy Museum admission tickets
https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/3933?locale=en

Looking back at the first showing of Constantin Brancusi's work (1876–1957) in the United States, in the 1913 Armory Show, one writer reflected that sculptures on view were “disturbing, so disturbing indeed that they completely altered the attitude of a great many New Yorkers towards a whole branch of art.” Indeed, Brancusi’s beguilingly simple forms looked like nothing else, then or since.

Rather than modeling clay like his peers, Brancusi carved his work directly from wood or stone, or cast it in bronze. Simultaneously, he rejected realism, preferring that his sculptures evoke rather than resemble the subjects named in their titles. Brancusi made bases for many of his sculptures, themselves complex constructions that became part of the work. He often moved works from base to base, or placed them directly on the floor of his studio, so that they lived in the world alongside ordinary objects, and among people.

Born in rural Romania, Brancusi moved to Paris in 1904, where he established his studio and quickly immersed himself in avant-garde art circles. In his adopted city, he embraced an experimental modern spirit, including an interest in modern machines and popular culture. With his friend Man Ray, he made films that captured his life in the studio—working with his materials and muses, activating his artworks through movement and recombination, and revealing his sources of inspiration such as animals at play, light in nature, and dance. Yet until his death he proudly presented himself as an outsider—cultivating his image as a peasant, with a long beard, work shirt, and sandals. The contradiction also informs his art making, which was dependent on ancient techniques as much as contemporary technologies.

This exhibition celebrates MoMA’s extraordinary holdings—11 sculptures by Brancusi will be shown together for the first time, alongside drawings, photographs, and films. A selection of never-before-seen archival materials shed light on his relationships with friends, sitters, and patrons, including this Museum. What emerges is a rich portrait of an artist whose risk-taking and inventive approach to form changed the course of the art that followed.

Brancusi collected records with music of many kinds. The playlist below, created by curators Paulina Pobocha and Mia Matthias, features selections from his extensive collection.

Organized by Paulina Pobocha, Associate Curator, with Mia Matthias, Curatorial Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture.
Brancusi’s Birds
5 images
787
Constantin Brancusi
Carolyn Lanchner, 2010
Paperback, 48 pages
$9.95

The exhibition is made possible by Monique M. Schoen Warshaw.

Major support is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, and by Jack Shear with The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund with major contributions from the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Alice and Tom Tisch, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

View works in the exhibition

Upcoming events

Gallery Sessions: The Essence
of Constantin Brancusi
Saturday, November 3, 11:30 a.m.
Monday, November 19, 1:30 p.m.
Monday, November 26, 11:30 a.m.

The Museum of Modern Art
Gallery experience
Constantin Brancusi. *Fish*. Paris 1930
Gallery Sessions: The Art and
Life of Constantin Brancusi
Tuesday, November 6, 1:30 p.m.
Friday, November 23, 11:30 a.m.
Sunday, November 25, 11:30 a.m.

The Museum of Modern Art
Gallery experience
Constantin Brancusi. *Maiastra*. 1910-12
Gallery Sessions: Brancusi’s Universe
Thursday, November 8, 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday, November 28, 1:30 p.m.

The Museum of Modern Art
Gallery experience
Gallery Sessions: What
Is Modern Sculpture?
Friday, November 9, 1:30 p.m.
Friday, November 30, 1:30 p.m.

Gallery experience
Member After Hours: Bruce
Nauman: Disappearing Acts,
Charles White: A Retrospective,
Constantin Brancusi Sculpture
Tuesday, November 20, 6:30–8:30 p.m.

The Museum of Modern Art
Gallery experience, for members
Constantin Brancusi. *Mlle Pogany*. Version I, 1913 (after a marble of 1912). Bronze with black patina, 17 1/4 x 8 1/2 x 12 1/2" (43.8 x 21.5 x 31.7 cm), on limestone base, 5 3/4 x 6 1/8 x 7 3/8" (14.6 x 15.6 x 18.7 cm). Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest (by exchange). © 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Member Gallery Talk:
Constantin Brancusi Sculpture
Wednesday, January 16, 2019, 12:30 p.m.









Sandra P.    11/1/2018


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